running training plan

Runners Self Assessment Test for Body Conditioning

The following exercises should be performed before completing the questions for the Bespoke Conditioning Plan for runners.

Press Ups

press up exercise

Photo ©: diawka / 123RF Stock Photo

Complete as many correct-form press ups without rest until unable to continue.

One complete press up is from start position shown, lowering body so that elbows bend to right angles and returning to start position

A modified option can be performed for those with less strength, by supporting the body on knees rather than feet

Record how many press ups were completed; standard or modified.

Burpees

Start from a position of standing upright with arms by your side.
Drop down into a squatting position so that hands touch the floor
Kick feet back to attain press up position.
Immediately bring feet back together to squat position.
Stand upright as start postion
That is one Burpee.
Count and record how many you can complete in 30 seconds

Wall Squat

Position yourself against a smooth wall, with back and head touching wall.
Knees bent at right angles, feet flat on floor shoulder-width apart (image a sitting position without a chair). The thighs should be parallel with the ground.

Lift right leg slightly, so that foot is completely off of the floor, hold for as long as possible
On replacing foot, immediately lift left leg and hold for as long as possible

Record your total time in seconds.

9-Stage Core Strength

Position the body as in a standard plank; straight line though head, body and legs. Body supported only by toes and elbows/forearms. Feet are shoulder-width apart.

plank exercise

Photo ©: phasinphoto / 123RF Stock Photo

Stages

  1. Hold start position for 60 seconds.
  2. Lift right arm and extend forwards; hold for 15 seconds.
  3. Replace right arm.
    Lift and extend left arm; hold for 15 seconds.
  4. Replace left arm.
    Lift right leg off ground approx 6 inches (15cm); hold straight for 15 seconds.
  5. Replace right leg.
    Lift left leg off ground approx 6 inches (15cm); hold straight for 15 seconds.
  6. Replace left leg.
    Lift right leg and left arm; hold for 15 seconds.
  7. Replace right leg and left arm.
    Lift left leg and right arm; hold for 15 seconds.
  8. Replace right leg and left arm.
    Remain in start position for 30 seconds.
  9. Relax.

Record how many stages you completed.

Hip Flex

Tight hip flexors is very common in people who run, especially those who also spend a long time sitting.
This simple test will determine if you have tight hip flexors.

Lie flat on your back with both legs out straight on the floor.
Bring your right knee up to your chest and pull to chest with hands.
Repeat with the right leg.

If the straightened leg lifts from the floor, the hip flexors are considered tight.

Standing Stork

With bare feet stand on one leg.
The sole of the foot of the free leg is placed on the inside of the knee of the supporting leg.
Raise on to the ball of the supporting foot for as long as possible without losing balance.
Losing balance means either:

  • The free leg is moved from it's start position.
  • The supporting foot's heel is returned to the floor.

Complete the test using both legs in turn.
Record the total time.

The results you have attained performing these tests should be noted on the Body Conditioning information page.

More details of these and other tests can be found at BrianMac Sports Coach

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